Experts warn: ‘Do not let your child use colouring books’

Do you let your child use colouring books? Child experts have warned that you could be making a mistake…

Expert warns: 'Do not let your child use colouring books'

by Kayleigh Dray |

Colouring books are popular amongst parents and children alike; they're a pleasant way to while away the time and have fun with felt tips.

However, according to childcare experts, colouring books - which see children colouring in a predawn picture - could be doing more harm than good.

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They explain: "Colouring books do improve hand-eye coordination, but so do many other things, such as building with blocks or putting together puzzles.

"It's more important for parents to realise that colouring books limit your child's creativity."

We should encourage our children to draw their own pictures, say experts. [stock image]
We should encourage our children to draw their own pictures, say experts. [stock image]

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They added: "You're denying them the chance to create their own artwork or to get their own imaginings down on paper. By giving them a predawn drawing, we're teaching them what art is 'supposed' to look like - and not encouraging them to make art of their own."

So what should parents do instead?

"Give them a blank sketchbook and some crayons, pencils, pens or paints. Then let them draw whatever they like.**"

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"This way, the drawing will be truly unique to them - and they won't be limited by pre-conceived ideas. Even if your child draws a squiggle and tells you it's a dinosaur, they're still putting a name to something they have created - which is truly amazing."

If your child needs a little inspiration, why not take them to an art gallery, a museum, the park, or even give them a stack of magazines? This way they can sit down and create their own impression of what they've seen, with no worries about straying outside the lines.

Some children will find drawing easier than others - but all do so if they feel successful, so be sure to praise their pictures.

Taking your children somewhere inspiring, with a pad and paper, will help encourage them to draw. [stock image]

After all, there's nothing better than seeing your work proudly pinned to mum's fridge, is there?

Do you think there's anything wrong with colouring books? Let us know via the Comments Box below, or tweet us over at @CloserOnline now.

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